Zoom Teeth Whitening

Description

One of the first things people notice is your smile.

A reflection of your personality, mood, and health, a smile bears the capacity to stamp an impression on people. A smile certainly augments the beauty in a face, and is thus regarded as one of the parameters for judging true beauty. If chipped, stained, or crooked teeth are “hiding” the real you, it’s time for a smile make over with Martin N. Gorman, DDS.

Let us guide you on your path to a lifelong healthy and beautiful smile. Modern restorative dentistry preserves and conserves your natural teeth. With whitening, porcelain veneers, natural-looking crowns and bridges, lifelike bonding and invisible braces, we’ve taken dentistry to a whole new level. Here’s how Cosmetic Dentistry and new modern treatments can give you the smile you’ve always wanted.

Brighten teeth that have lost their sparkle
Dr. Gorman can treat discolored, stained or aging teeth with our state-of-the-art whitening process. The treatment can be completed in just over an hour in our office, or you can choose at-home treatments.

Bleaching vs. Whitening

According to the FDA, the term “bleaching” is permitted to be used only when the teeth can be whitened beyond their natural color. This applies strictly to products that contain bleach — typically hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide.

The term “whitening,” on the other hand, refers to restoring a tooth’s surface color by removing dirt and debris. So any product that cleans (like a toothpaste) is considered a whitener. Of course, the term whitening sounds better than bleaching, so it is more frequently used — even when describing products that contain bleach.

Why Teeth Whitening? Examining Enamel

Most of us start out with sparkling white teeth, thanks to their porcelain-like enamel surface. Composed of microscopic crystalline rods, tooth enamel is designed to protect the teeth from the effects of chewing, gnashing, trauma and acid attacks caused by sugar. But over the years enamel is worn down, becoming more transparent and permitting the yellow color of dentin — the tooth’s core material — to show through.

During routine chewing, dentin remains intact while millions of micro-cracks occur in the enamel. It is these cracks, as well as the spaces between the crystalline enamel rods, that gradually fill up with stains and debris. As a result, the teeth eventually develop a dull, lackluster appearance.

Teeth whitening removes the stains and debris, leaving the enamel cracks open and exposed. Some of the cracks are quickly re-mineralized by saliva, while others are filled up again with organic debris.

What Causes Tooth Staining?

Age: There is a direct correlation between tooth color and age. Over the years, teeth darken as a result of wear and tear and stain accumulation. Teenagers will likely experience immediate, dramatic results from whitening. In the twenties, as the teeth begin to show a yellow cast, teeth-whitening may require a little more effort. By the forties, the yellow gives way to brown and more maintenance may be called for. By the fifties, the teeth have absorbed a host of stubborn stains which can prove difficult (but not impossible) to remove.

Starting color: We are all equipped with an inborn tooth color that ranges from yellow-brownish to greenish-grey, and intensifies over time. Yellow-brown is generally more responsive to bleaching than green-grey.

Translucency and thinness: These are also genetic traits that become more pronounced with age. While all teeth show some translucency, those that are opaque and thick have an advantage: they appear lighter in color, show more sparkle and are responsive to bleaching. Teeth that are thinner and more transparent — most notably the front teeth — have less of the pigment that is necessary for bleaching. According to cosmetic dentists, transparency is the only condition that cannot be corrected by any form of teeth whitening.

Eating habits: The habitual consumption of red wine, coffee, tea, cola, carrots, oranges and other deeply-colored beverages and foods causes considerable staining over the years. In addition, acidic foods such as citrus fruits and vinegar contribute to enamel erosion. As a result, the surface becomes more transparent and more of the yellow-colored dentin shows through.

Smoking habits: Nicotine leaves brownish deposits which slowly soak into the tooth structure and cause intrinsic discoloration.

Drugs / chemicals: Tetracycline usage during tooth formation produces dark grey or brown ribbon stains which are very difficult to remove. Excessive consumption of fluoride causes fluorosis and associated areas of white mottling.

Grinding: Most frequently caused by stress, teeth grinding (gnashing, bruxing, etc.) can add to micro-cracking in the teeth and can cause the biting edges to darken.

Trauma: Falls and other injuries can produce sizable cracks in the teeth, which collect large amounts of stains and debris.

Hydrogen Peroxide vs. Carbamide Peroxide

The bleach preference for in-office whitening, where time is limited, is powerful and fast-acting hydrogen peroxide. When used in teeth bleaching, hydrogen peroxide concentrations range from approximately nine percent to 40 percent.
By contrast, the bleach of preference for at-home teeth whitening is slower acting carbamide peroxide, which breaks down into hydrogen peroxide. Carbamide peroxide has about a third of the strength of hydrogen peroxide. This means that a 15 percent solution of carbamide peroxide is the rough equivalent of a five percent solution of hydrogen peroxide.

How White Can You Go? A Matter of Esthetics

Teeth whitening results are subjective, varying considerably from person to person. Many are immediately delighted with their outcome, while others may be disappointed. Before you embark on any whitening treatment, ask your dentist for a realistic idea of the results you are likely to achieve and how long it should take to achieve them. Expectations play a major role in teeth whitening.

Maintaining Your Whiter Smile

To extend the longevity of newly whitened teeth, Dr. Gorman recommends:

At-home follow-up or maintenance whitening — implemented immediately or performed as infrequently as once a year.
Avoiding dark-colored foods and beverages for at least a week after whitening.
Whenever possible, sipping dark-colored beverages with a straw.
Practicing excellent oral hygiene — brushing and flossing after meals and at bedtime.